ACL Tear Surgery or Not: New Study Show More Reasons to Avoid Surgery

by Chris Centeno, MD /

acl-surgery-or-not

ACL tear surgery or not? Most people believe that getting their ACL reconstructed after a torn ligament is like having a worn-out part replaced in their car. Nothing could be further from the truth. Now, a new study shows yet another reason why an ACL surgically “repaired” knee is not like the original equipment.

The Problems with ACL Surgery

The pitfalls of ACL surgery aren’t new to this blog; I’ve covered many other research articles in the past. Here are some links that summarize the published research on why ACL surgery isn’t all it’s cracked up to be:

The New ACL Study

New research should help you answer the question of ACL tear surgery or not by evaluating how the procedure changes the way patients land. The study looked at how landing mechanics change in patients after ACL surgery between 6 months and 12 months after surgery. Regrettably, the vast majority of forces and angles that the team measured upon landing a jump were still abnormal and not like the uninjured knee at 12 months. Hence, the researchers concluded that ACL surgery likely permanently altered the patient’s ability to land (or at least if it ever returns to normal, it’s after more than a year).

Given that many high-level athletes who jump and land are released back to their sports at one year, it’s scary to think what can happen to the hip, knee, and ankle over the long run due to these abnormal mechanics. Why is this happening? The new replacement ligament goes in at a different angle, is usually only single-bundle versus the natural double-bundle configuration, and doesn’t have the same ability to provide position sense to the body upon landing.

Is There a Better Way?

One way to answer the question of “ACL tear surgery or not” is to avoid the surgery by using the power of your body to heal the tear. In our extensive experience, about 70% of ACL tears that currently get surgery could have been treated with a precise injection of stem cells instead. This procedure is highly technical and requires advanced injection skills using X-ray guidance, but we’ve seen it take ACLs that have been read out on MRI as completely torn and return them to a normal MRI signal, tighten them down to normal levels, and reduce pain while increasing function.

The upshot? Getting your ACL replaced permanently alters the mechanics of the knee joint. This new study is just one of many that show that these surgically reconstructed knees are never like the original equipment. Hence, if you’re in the lucky 70% of ACL tear patients who are candidates to use a precise stem cell injection to heal the ACL inside the knee and keep their original ligaments, why wouldn’t you try to go that route?

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6 thoughts on “ACL Tear Surgery or Not: New Study Show More Reasons to Avoid Surgery

  1. ruth shan

    what is the percent of stem cells replacement for knees in a 78 year old lady that has no health problems , asking for my mother in law

    1. Regenexx Team Post author

      Ruth,
      Generally speaking, the stats are very good. Please see: http://www.regenexx.com/blog/regenexx-research-review/ But to evaluate your mother in law’s case in particular she’d need to submit the Candidate form so we can go over her MRI’s and Medical history with her to see if she’d be a good Candidate for a Regenexx procedure.

  2. Jasmit Singh

    Hi! I have a near complete ACL tear after a road accident on November 21st. Need treatment… Please guide with the process.

    1. Regenexx Team Post author

      Jasmit,
      The first step is to submit the “Are You A Candidate” form, which will result in a Candidacy Evaluation with one of our Physicians. It can be found here: http://www.regenexx.com/regenexx-acl-repair-for-torn-anterior-cruciate-ligament/ Once submitted you will receive an email detailing the next steps including how to upload your MRI. A time to speak to the Doctor by phone will be set up and they will explain the process from there.

  3. Pradip

    I had complete tear of acl while playing a volleyball..I’m 26 year old. How much time it will take to heal the rear i.e.steam cell therapy.

    1. Regenexx Team Post author

      Pradip,
      Not for ACL stem cell procedures in general, but for the Regenexx Perc-ACLR ACL stem cell procedure, you’ll find the healing times here: https://regenexx.com/blog/acl-surgery-return-to-play/. Here is additional information on the procedure: https://regenexx.com/blog/acl-tear-repair/

Chris Centeno, MD

Regenexx Founder

Chris Centeno, MD is a specialist in regenerative medicine and the new field of Interventional Orthopedics. Centeno pioneered orthopedic stem cell procedures in 2005 and is responsible for a large amount of the published research on stem cell use for orthopedic applications.
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